Category Archives: Sepsis

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Comment

This may be an indication that certain services available to cancer patients, such as hospice, allow for more efficient use of health-care resources. This study utilized data from the NHDS and SEER databases, which may limit generalizability to the US … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Conclusion

Also consistent with our prior study2 of the incidence of sepsis is the higher incidence in men relative to women. The etiology for these disparities remains controversial, but factors such as differing access to care and differing likelihood of receiving … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Discussion

Sepsis was present in 28.8% of all deaths among hospitalized cancer patients. Patients with a history of cancer who survived hospitalization with sepsis were more likely to be discharged to another medical facility than for cancer patients without sepsis, but … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Discharge Status

The case-fatality rate for sepsis was highest for patients with lung cancer at 39.7%, significantly higher than for patients with cancers of the breast, prostate, and skin, which each averaged approximately 26% (each p < 0.05 compared to lung cancer). … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Comparison With Other Comorbidities

Male patients accounted for a disproportionate share of sepsis cases among patients with cancer, with a mean incidence rate of 1523 per 100,000 male patients with cancer, compared to 1,320 per 100,000 female patients with cancer, yielding a RR of … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Incidence

The source of infection causing sepsis was determined for the most common cancer subtypes and was most often related to the primary tumor type, as shown in Table 2. Of lung cancer patients who acquired sepsis, 42% of cases were … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Demographics and Causes of Sepsis

Predictors of death with sepsis were assessed by multivariable logistic regression modeling including potentially relevant predictors (age, gender, race, source of infection [categorized as respiratory, genitourinary, GI, skin, soft tissue and bone, and other]; chronic comorbid medical conditions [categorized as … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Definitions

Cases of sepsis in patients with malignancy were identified from discharge records in the NHDS during the years 1979 through 2001 that included ICD-9-CM codes for both sepsis and for cancer. Sepsis was defined as previously validated: 038.x (septicemia), 20.0 … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy: Data Source

The National Center for Health Statistics has conducted the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) continuously since 1965. Since 1979, the NHDS has conformed to the guidelines of the Uniform Hospital Discharge Data Set for consistency of reporting in records. The … Continue reading

The Epidemiology of Sepsis in Patients With Malignancy

Sepsis is the host immune response to infection, defined clinically as the intersection between physiologic derangements known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and infection. Sepsis is a relatively common reason for acute-care hospitalization, occurring in > 700,000 people each … Continue reading